• Background Image

    News & Updates

    Desmond Tutu

September 11, 2012

The Role of Women in Creating a Peaceful World

Archbishop Desmond Tutu has said. “The world would be a peaceful place if it were ruled by women…Women were by nature more inclined towards compassion, whereas men tend to feel they have to be macho. You are basically life-giving, life-affirming. That is what you are naturally when you are unspoilt… Women can actually make society civil…Actually it is very straightforward: let women take over.”

I have written articles and made videos about this, as I see female empowerment as the only practical way we can create a peaceful world. My latest article on this, published on the Hub pages, is called, “A Practical Method of Creating a Loving and Caring World.”

 

October 6, 2011

A Life of Truth

An active global citizen who embodies the values and virtues that the world needs now, Archbishop Desmond Tutu has chosen to stand up for the vulnerable. He has chosen to speak out against injustice. He has chosen to confront those who provide poor leadership. He has been committed to the values of environmental sustainability and he has galvanized a whole generation of activists to work for good environmental stewardship and an end to poverty.

desmond-tutu-and-nelson-mandela

Desmond Tutu and Nelson Mandela

Birthday Controversy

Archbishop Tutu’s birthday celebrations have been marred, as his friend and fellow Nobel laureate, His Holiness, the Dalai Lama was unable to attend. The South African government failed to issue the Tibetan spiritual leader a visa, in what critics say was a move to placate China, a major trading partner.

In typical fashion, Tutu was vocal in his criticism of the ruling African National Congress (ANC), vowing to pray for its downfall, just as he did for the demise of the Apartheid government in the 1980’s.  He summarized the situation by saying, “We betrayed our struggle. All the people involved in our struggle are turning in their graves.”

Still an Untiring Activist

Desmond Tutu continues his activism and rarely refrains from criticizing the South African government’s policies, whether on HIV/AIDS or the ANC’s dominance of politics.

His concern for human rights and democracy extends beyond his own country.  He demands freedom for the people of Myanmar and promotes the rights of Palestinians, often irking pro-Israel lobby groups. His latest campaign, championed through The Elders, a group of fellow global leaders, is to ban child marriage wherever it is practiced.  Under Archbishop Tutu’s leadership, people around the world have grown up, and now demand an end to ancient, primitive practices that are widely abhorred, like child marriage.

The Tutu Legacy

desmond-and-mpho-tutu

Archbishop Desmond Tutu and daughter Rev. Mpho Tutu

Recently, Rev Mpho Tutu, the youngest daughter of Archbishop Desmond Tutu, returned to South Africa to become the founding director of the Desmond and Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation.  The foundation will preserve his papers, regulate the use of his name and continue to provide an honest commentary on moral issues.

She has also published a biography of her father entitled Tutu: The Authorized Portrait. Mpho interviewed dozens of world leaders for the book.

Across the world, people of all religions, races, ages, ideologies and social classes have been touched directly or indirectly by Desmond Tutu. They have been impacted by his actions. Their lives have been changed by his choices. Even now his legacy continues, influencing generations to come.

Desmond Tutu is a leader who has elevated truth to its rightful place at the top of the list of human virtues.  Without seeking the truth and always speaking the truth, even in the face of danger, we cannot know courage or effect the changes needed for survival.  Archbishop Tutu reaches out now, as he always has, to the new generation with his powerful, timeless message of global peace.  His example is one of showing that to pursue this noble goal takes a tireless commitment to, and a deep respect for, all life.  People around the world can join in celebrating our great good fortune of Desmond Tutu’s birth and remarkable life of 80 years so far.  May the future bless us with his presence, wisdom,and inspirational leadership for years to come.

October 6, 2011

The Goal – A True Union of Hearts and Minds

When awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991, Aung San Suu Kyi was called “One of the most extraordinary examples of civil courage in Asia in recent decades.” She has said that one of her inspirations was South Africa’s successful struggle to end apartheid led by peacemakers like Nelson Mandela, Desmond Tutu and others who never stopped working to make South Africans free from oppression.

Aung_San_Suu_Kyi

Aung San Suu Kyi

At the beginning of this week, on Monday, October 3, 2011, Aung San Suu Kyi, Burma’s (Myanmar’s) pro-democracy leader, expressed worry about the hope of reaching unity and democracy in her country. She explained that the challenge remains to bring Myanmar’s many diverse ethnic groups together. Like so many other leaders in the non-violent civil disobedience tradition, Suu Kyi has sacrificed much in the cause of bringing Myanmar out of its 20-year isolation into the bright dawn of democracy. After 15 years of detention, she was finally released in late 2010. She also suffered the cruel punishment of not being able to see her beloved husband one last time before he died as the government denied his request to travel from England to Burma in the last few months of his life.

general_aung_san

General Aung San

Suu Kyi’s story is one of personal activism in the present-day that is a model for people who value the ultimate goal of worldwide peace, beginning with what they can do within their own cultures to instill the tradition of non-violence. It is not surprising that this daughter of Aung San, Commander of the Burma Independence Army until 1947, would be focused on creating and supporting a democracy in her homeland. Her father was assassinated in 1947 when Suu Kyi was just two years old, and soon after, her mother, Daw Khin Kyi, became active in politics, resulting in her appointment as Burma’s ambassador to India in 1960. It was there that Suu Kyi began a stellar academic career that took her to Oxford University in England for an undergraduate degree and then on to Kyoto University as a Visiting Scholar at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies. During this time she published significant work in academic literature, met and married her husband, Professor Michael Aris, and started a family with the birth of her two sons.

Suu-Kyis-husband-Michael Aris with their sons Alexander and Kim

Suu Kyi's husband Michael Aris with their sons Alexander and Kim

In 1988 Suu Kyi returned to Rangoon from her home in England to care for her mother who had been stricken by a stroke. While there, she observed the unrest around her and began her public life, making speeches protesting the government’s ban on more than four people gathering for a meeting as well as making arrests without trials. By September 1988 when the National League for Democracy was established, Suu Kyi found herself serving as General-Secretary, with a national platform from which she could support non-violent disobedience as the way toward democracy in Burma. In December of that same year, her beloved mother, Daw Khin Kyi died, and Suu Kyi committed her life to the service of Burma, following in the footsteps of both her mother and father.

Aung San Suu Kyi could easily have stayed in England, as a successful academic contributing important work about the political and economic cultures of Asia, but she chose the more difficult path of personal activism. Instead of staying safely out of harm’s way in England with her husband and children, she took a step requiring a very special kind of courage—to put the good of the many above her own needs, mirroring the commitment her parents demonstrated toward freedom for all within Burma.

Aung San Suu Kyi sepaking to crowdWhen she spoke this week to students in Johannesburg, she asked that the World watch events in Burma closely, and speak out as part of the global community against the atrocities reported to be happening at the hands of the army right now. Aung San Suu Kyi assures us that “We are determined to make a success of our struggle for democracy. We are not just going to sit. We are going to move to get to where we want to go.” Given the great courage Suu Kyi has shown over more than two decades since she returned to Burma to care for her mother, it is safe to say that she is a leader with unwavering purpose. She counts among her friends other great peacemakers like Archbishop Tutu, Nelson Mandela, His Holiness The Dalai Lama, and Gro Harlem Brundtland. Aung San Suu Kyi, like her friends, is an inspirational light shining on the path of peace for us all to take together into the future.