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    Desmond Tutu

April 12, 2016

Archbishop Tutu: Small Steps to Make the World a Better Place

Not everything need be a grand gesture.

Archbishop Tutu organizes a group to collect trash on the occasion of his 82nd birthday.

Archbishop Tutu organizes a group to collect trash on the occasion of his 82nd birthday.

Many people know the Archbishop for his work on the global stage, but this week, the Times Live in Cape Town was alerted to the Archbishop’s efforts to make the world better on a somewhat smaller scale.

On Sunday evening, real estate agent Peter Andrianatos spotted the Archbishop picking up trash while on a walk in the the Cape Town suburb of Milnerton, where the Archbishop lives.

“He walks the streets daily for exercise‚ but whatever litter he sees lying in the street‚ he picks up and puts it in the nearest dustbin,” Andrianatos posted to Facebook. “I believe he does this on a regular basis in Milnerton.”

The Archbishop, who was hospitalized twice toward the end of last year but who has been returning to a more regular schedule, took the praise with his usual humility. “I am feeling much better‚ thank you‚ though not necessarily any younger than I did six months ago,” he explained. “I’ve been picking up litter on my walks for years‚ and encourage other to do the same.”

“I think it’s remarkable for a man of that age and that stature bother,” said Andrianatos of the archbishop who is 85 years old. “May our local resident of Milnerton be blessed‚ Archbishop Desmond Tutu is a legend.”

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(Source: Times Live)

April 11, 2016

Celebrating our Volunteers During National Volunteer Week

“Do your little bit of good where you are; its those little bits of good put together that overwhelm the world.” – Desmond Tutu

President Obama has proclaimed this week National Volunteer Week in the United States. At the Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation, we could not do the work we do without the amazing support of our amazing volunteers and we see this week as a time to thank and celebrate you!

So many of you are professionals, retirees, students or amazing individuals with time and talents that you share with us so generously. As President Obama said in his proclamation, “Volunteers help drive our country’s progress, and day in and day out, they make extraordinary sacrifices to expand promise and possibility.  During National Volunteer Week, let us shed the cynicism that says one person cannot make a difference in the lives of others by embracing each of our individual responsibilities to serve and shape a brighter future for all.” Those of you that volunteer with the Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation, embody President Obama’s message every day.

From our legal team, our wonderful publicist, our web design, social media, interns and more – I am inspired by how all of you have found unique and meaningful ways to contribute to the organization. Some of you contribute on a daily basis and some when we have events or special community programs. But with all of you, your work truly captures the spirit of ubuntu, and I really am because of you.

On behalf of Archbishop Desmond Tutu, our Board, and all of us at the Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation, I would like to thank all of our volunteers who help make our organization a catalyst for change and an inspiration to young people throughout the United States and the world.

Brian Rusch
Executive Director
Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation

If you would like to get involved volunteering with the Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation, visit our volunteer page and let us know!

March 29, 2016

Couple meets Archbishop Tutu on 21st Anniversary Trip

tutuAn anniversary is always a special time for couples but for Steve Ludlow and Geoffrey Taylor their 21st proved to be particularly memorable.

The pair, who live in Station Road, Henley, were in South Africa to renew their vows when they were introduced to Desmond Tutu, the 85-year-old retired Anglican bishop and human rights campaigner, while making arrangements for the ceremony.

The men first met at St George’s Cathedral in Cape Town on March 6, 1995, so they returned to celebrate.

Steve, 59, says: “We explained in an email what we wanted to do.”

“We met in the cathedral in 1995 and obviously life has moved on a great deal since then. Who would have thought we could marry each other?”

“We went down to the cafe to meet the dean and there was Desmond Tutu, who needs no introduction.”

“I’m fairly mouthy at the best of times but I was thunderstruck because I couldn’t believe I was being introduced to this elder statesman.”

“Who would believe two guys from Henley would get to meet someone like that? We sat down and had a chat, which was mind-blowing. We talked about the fact Geoffrey and I had met in the cathedral 21 years before and we told him about where we lived and what we wanted to do and he said all that sounded fine by him.”

“His daughter married her female partner in Amsterdam not too long ago.”

“He said ‘unfortunately, I’m away, otherwise I’d come along!’ I think he understood how we felt, what we wanted to do and why St George’s is such a special place to us. You don’t usually expect to find a husband in a cathedral! He said ‘the cathedral is about bringing people together’.”

“I’ve never, ever met anyone like that. People say ‘did you have a good holiday?’ and we reply ‘we’ve only got the one photo’ and when they say ‘what a shame’ we show it to them and they say ‘oh, wow’.”

The couple had a civil ceremony at Henley Registry Office in 2009 and last year were married there.

Source: Henley Standard

February 23, 2016

Desmond Tutu, the Anglican Church, and Ending Discrimination of LGBTI People

This article originally appeared on Medium.com

“I would not worship a God who is homophobic and that is how deeply I feel about this. I am as passionate about this campaign as I ever was about Apartheid. For me, it is at the same level.” — Desmond Tutu

At the end of 2015, the Reverend Canon Mpho Tutu, Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s youngest daughter, married her partner Professor Marceline van Furth. The event was a small civil ceremony held in the home of van Furth’s parents in The Netherlands. For those of us in North America and Europe, the news was received with joyous celebration, and congratulatory messages poured out from luminaries across the globe.

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But in some circles, the news was not quite so positive. Particularly in parts of Africa and the Middle East, a stream of hatred and negativity came pouring in, directed not just at the couple, but toward the Archbishop, various Read More

February 12, 2016

Bay Area Youth Create Song, Video Inspired by Desmond Tutu Peace3 Initiative

#Peace3 video aims to inspire millennial peace builders to find Peace Within, Peace Between, and Peace Among.

The Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation (DTPF) is thrilled to announce the release of the song and music video “Peace3”, which is the result of a collaboration between the Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation and Bay Area youth non-profit NegusWorld. The song is the first in a series of collaborations between the Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation and youth organizations across the United States in support of their #Peace3 initiative.

The mission of #Peace3 is to be a catalyst for global peace by creating a world in which everyone values human dignity and embraces our essential interconnectedness – using Desmond Tutu’s life and teachings to inspire young people to build a world of peace within, peace between people and peace among nations. The project also aims to inspire one million young adults, aged 17-22, to learn and engage in peacebuilding as their life’s work.

“We launched the #Peace3 program with the idea to inspire young people to take action. The youth of NegusWorld came to us inspired by the idea of peace within, peace between and peace among and asked us if they could write a song about it,” said Brian Rusch, Executive Director of the Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation. “They perfectly captured the essence of the program while simultaneously creating an anthem of peace for their generation.” Read More

February 8, 2016

Archbishop Tutu urges South Africans not to abandon commitment to reconciliation.

Chairman of the TRC (Truth and Reconciliation Commission) Archbishop Desmond Tutu (R) hands over the TRC report to South Africa's President Nelson Mandela at the State theater Building in Pretoria October 29. South Africa's Truth Commission has found that the ruling African National Congress (ANC) is politically and morally accountable for gross human rights violations committed during its 30-year struggle against apartheid.

Chairman of the TRC (Truth and Reconciliation Commission) Archbishop Desmond Tutu (R) hands over the TRC report to South Africa’s President Nelson Mandela at the State theater Building in Pretoria October 29. South Africa’s Truth Commission has found that the ruling African National Congress (ANC) is politically and morally accountable for gross human rights violations committed during its 30-year struggle against apartheid.

Responding to the laying of criminal charges last week against former President FW De Klerk and former police minister Adriaan Vlok by an organization called The Anti-Racism Action Forum, Archbishop Desmond Tutu urged South Africans not to abandon commitment to reconciliation. Tutu said the consequences of the TRC’s business being left unfinished included perpetrators of apartheid era human rights violations evading justice‚ victims being denied the closure they deserved – and cracks in the fabric of the nation emerging and being exploited by political opportunists.

Over the past few months‚ South African media had carried a stream of stories highlighting disturbing expressions of racism and prejudice on social media. Political commentators had increasingly and misguidedly blamed the country’s reconciliation process for its socio-economic and political woes.

“It has almost become fashionable to undermine the integrity of former President De Klerk‚ and even Madiba is being derided in some circles for ‘selling out’ in favor of white capital‚” Archbishop Tutu said. Read More